Inner Distances

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Rating: 

Average: 5 (5 votes)

Curated by Amanda VanValkenburg

This screening is curated around work that examines how technology affects sense of place and sense of self. Relationships to location becomes abstracted through the mediation of devices. The internet creates familiar landing sites, social media pages become extensions of identity, and google maps can be used to explore topographically accurate recreations of locations around the world. Sense of place is an abstraction of location navigated by information, senses, and physical stimulus. This screening is focused on repurposing devices or software to explore concepts of space and technology, or other strategies that investigate relationships between the virtual and the physical.

Programme:
- Bunte Kuh (Parastoo Anoushahpour, Ryan Ferko & Faraz Anoushahpour, 5 min)
Through a flood of images and impressions, a narrator attempts to recall a family holiday. Produced in Berlin and Toronto, Bunte Kuh combines a found postcard, family photo album, and original footage to weave together the temporal realities of two separate vacations.

- Embargo (Johann Lurf, 10 minutes)
The oscillating sound of video games, glass facades, barbed wire and high walls that block our view of what goes on behind them. Someone has something to hide here. In EMBARGO we peer over the barriers, past red eyes and CCTV cameras and into state-of-the-art premises of arms and drone manufacturers. The elaborate recording techniques create quite a distinctive spatiality, drifting between distance and closeness. A science-fiction nightmare, dangerously close to reality.

- Clinton and Sanders Looking at the World and Naming Things for the First Time (Orr Menirom, 11 minutes)
This short video is based on a CNN debate which took place in April 2016 between Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders. The visuals of the debate have been removed and replaced with a series of dreamlike images. Paired with this alternative footage, the politicians’ words narrate a new and personal story, revealing the subconscious of the politicians. The debate turns into a Rorschach test onto which viewers can project their own thoughts and associations.

- Reunion 1 (Brock Neilson, 7 minutes)
The artist re-enters a space from their childhood as an adult, freely exploring and reimagining the tone of the space through the lens of an iphone and a year-long process of editing sound and footage on an apple desktop computer.

- The Age of Branches (Daniel Spangler, 8 minutes)
A dramatic retelling of systemic collapse, unfolding on the scale of nanoseconds, The Age of Branches examines the American power infrastructure during a crisis of continental proportions, reframing the jargon of its technical port-mortem as mythic language.

- Unnatural Disasters (Amanda VanValkenburg, 10 minutes)
A 3D sculpted environment full of architecture caught in the act of critical change. Simulated disasters oscillate on the border between realism and complete artifice with a slow observation of decay. Basing each vignette off of existing locations, the 3D re-enactment allows an destructive intervention that is ephemeral by design.

- Terrestrial (Calum Walter, 10 minutes)
The observations of an object in motion: A mobile device captures the trajectories of objects liberated from and bound to land, against a backdrop of uniquely human dissonance. Terrestrial attempts to articulate a desire to transcend bodily limits with electronics and machines, while acknowledging an unavoidable level of dysfunction. The film was inspired by an incident in 2014 where a Blue Line train in Chicago failed to stop at its final destination, the O’Hare airport, and eventually came to a stop halfway up the escalator at the airport’s entrance. Terrestrial re- imagines this accident as an earthbound machine’s failed takeoff.

- Red Capriccio (Blake Williams, 7 minutes)
An anaglyph 3D found footage film about machines and landscape that interlaces motion with stasis, crescendos with glissandos, and reds with blues. Its triangular structure juxtaposes scenes of a parked Chevy Caprice police vehicle, a cruise along Montréal’s infamous Turcot Interchange, and a visit to a basement rave room.

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Dates: 

Friday, September 8, 2017 - 20:00

Venue: 

  • 1084 N. Milwaukee Avenue
    60642   Chicago, Illinois
    United States
    41° 54' 5.4216" N, 87° 39' 49.5216" W