Screenings

  • Alternative Visions: Films of Jerome Hiler

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    Jerome Hiler's In the Stone House records and recollects a period of life of four years in rural New Jersey. In the latter 1960s, two young guys with monastic leanings leave the clatter of Manhattan’s art and film scene to catch the wave of higher consciousness that was about to change the world forever to find themselves washed ashore in a place only slightly updated from Way Down East. The monastic retreat quickly turned into the weekend getaway for a host of extravagant Manhattanites seeking films and fun. We learned from hitch-hiking guests that the police referred to our haven as “the stone house.” Although New Shores is a completely independent project, it could also be seen as a continuation of the world of In the Stone House. It affords glimpses of life led over three decades from the 1970s to the 1990s in San Francisco.

    Dates: 

    Wednesday, October 22, 2014 - 19:00 to Thursday, October 23, 2014 - 18:55

    Venue: 

  • Sight Unseen presents Richard Tuohy: Hand Crafted Cinema

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    While many commercial film labs are shutting there doors, a counter movement is taking place in the form of the international network of artist-run film labs. The Australian experimental filmmaker, Richard Tuohy – a prominent figure in this cinematic d-i-y turn – sees this new phase for the traditional media as an opportunity; as a chance for the film artist to directly engage with the once inaccessible, now too often discarded tools of the traditional film lab. 

    Tuohy's hand crafted cinema presents us with multiple visual manipulations in camera, in printer techniques, in experimental processing procedures and in projection to sculpt an activated and reanimated reality which collectively represent a distinctively cinematic experience. More visual then cerebral, these pictures move, and with an energy unique to film. While covering a range of techniques, strategies and visual themes, they each share the same tenacious unfolding of a set of abstract possibilities from out of singular visual ideas. This program presents eight hand-processed and d-i-y printed 16mm film works from the artists recent output. The films, though diverse, are all highly abstract and tightly structured and share a fascination with the visual possibilities of basic traditional film technology.

    Dates: 

    Friday, October 24, 2014 - 21:00 to Saturday, October 25, 2014 - 22:55

    Venue: 

    The Red Room - Baltimore, United States
  • Mary Woronov, Warhol Superstar: Hedy

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    In 1966, screen legend Hedy Lamarr was arrested in Los Angeles for shoplifting $21.48 worth of laxative tablets and eye drops. That same year, Andy Warhol, screenwriter Ronald Tavel and an amazing ensemble cast created the 66-minute Hedy, a camp reenactment, including arrest, interrogation, trial, execution and plastic surgical transformation. Representing the pinnacle of Warhol’s “superstar” phase of filmmaking, Hedy features the gloriously oblivious Mario Montez in the starring role with Mary Woronov as the fabulously antagonistic sadomasochistic store detective. Gerard Malanga, Jack Smith, Ingrid Superstar and Ronald Tavel also appear. Soundtrack composed by John Cale and Lou Reed.

    Mary Woronov in person

    Dates: 

    Friday, November 7, 2014 - 22:00 to Saturday, November 8, 2014 - 21:55

    Venue: 

    Yerba Buena Center for the Arts - San Francisco, United States
  • MuMaBoX #33: Image materials

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    The exhibition that MuMa dedicates to Nicolas de Staël gives us the opportunity to question the materiality of the image. Light as a raw material. It passes through the eye of a painter who restores it in his landscapes: glowing in the South, changing in the North. In the films of Nathaniel Dorsky and Paul Clipson, it flows into the camera lens and fixes into film, writing that subtle partition of clear and dark, revealing the optical magic of the recording device.

    Device set aside by practitioners of direct cinema, cameraless film, who paint directly on the film as Stan Brakhage and Emmanuel Lefrant. The film strip is no longer simply the space where the image is formed, it increases in thickness and becomes the concrete support of the pictorial material. A different material for the image, the pixel has only temporal reality, but may be subject to speculation. In the work of Jacques Perconte, compressions and decompressions allow passages from the figurative to the abstract, without opposing them, as in the painting of Staël.

    Dates: 

    Wednesday, October 15, 2014 - 18:00 to Thursday, October 16, 2014 - 17:55

    Venue: 

  • Synchronised Fallibles - Laura Hindmarsh & Bea Haut

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    Australian artist Laura Hindmarsh and London based artist Bea Haut bring together two 16mm film based works featuring the artist embodied within the frame. Present and exposed, yet deceptive through the coupling of alterations in time and space, these works complicate human gestures and unravel 'charged moments'. Laura Hindmarsh is an Australian artist based in Tasmania, currently undertaking a self-directed residency in London. Her practice is an ongoing inquiry into the nature of perception and representation, and is informed by experimental music, expanded cinema and meta-fiction – works that demonstrate their own process and condition of existence. Bea Haut is a London based artist who works primarily with 16mm film in an expanded form. This manifests and behaves as sculpture, installations, projections, photography and printmaking. Haut programmes Analogue Recurring, a screening series dedicated to celebrating experimental film.

    Dates: 

    Tuesday, October 14, 2014 - 18:00 to Wednesday, October 15, 2014 - 20:55

    Venue: 

    Apiary Studios - London, United Kingdom
  • Visions presents Robert Todd + Vincent Grenier

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    VISIONS in collaboration with the Festival du nouveau cinéma presents short films by Robert Todd and Vincent Grenier

    Todd and Grenier will be showing new films at the FNC this year and VISIONS will be holding a special presentation of more amazing works by these masters of cinema.

    Robert Todd = Shades of Grey [2014 | 15:00] + Slow Rise [2014 | 7:00]
    « ...ses images, d’une grande précision sculpturale, affinent notre sens de la vision. » - L’âge d’or - La cinémathèque royale de Belgique

    Vincent Grenier = Waiting Room [2012 | 8:43] + Tabula Rasa [2004 | 7:30] + Surface Tension II [1995 | 4:00]
    « ...a master of quiet, delicate forms, gradual transitions, and wry misdirection...a true poet of the medium. » - Blaffer Art Museum - Houston

    Dates: 

    Sunday, October 19, 2014 - 18:00 to Monday, October 20, 2014 - 17:55

    Venue: 

    Microcinéma être - Montreal, Canada
  • FNC Lab: Feature films And Short film Programs

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    The Festival du nouveau cine´ma (FNC) has been shining the spotlight on experimental cinema for over 40 years. Werner Schroeter was our guest in the ’70s, and in 2013 the Festival awarded a Louve d’honneur to renowned experimental filmmaker Jonas Mekas. The FNC continues its mission of showcasing hybrid works using experimental, expanded and multi-disciplinary cinematic forms. The FNC Lab section, where these innovative practices take centre stage, features a series of much-awaited events that uphold the experimental genre, in which artists and filmmakers call on a variety of techniques to make audiences question and reflect on the fundamental identity of cinema in order to propel it forward.

    Dates: 

    Thursday, October 9, 2014 - 20:30 to Monday, October 20, 2014 - 17:55

    Venue: 

    Festival du nouveau cinéma - Montreal, Canada
  • Slow Glass and other films

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    Wry and formally ingenious, John Smith’s films are playful explorations of the language of cinema and thought-provoking reflections on the image’s role in politics, war, and the global economy. The 2013 Jarman Award winner will screen and discuss a selection of films from throughout his career including Slow Glass (1988-91), an exploration of memory, perception and change through the stories of a nostalgic glazier; Blight (1994-96) a stunning montage depicting the destruction of a London street to make way for new roads; and Pyramids / Skunk (Hotel Diaries #5) (2006-07), in which a chocolate bar in a Rotterdam hotel room eventually reminds the filmmaker that there are important things going on in the world outside. (76 minutes)

    Dates: 

    Friday, October 17, 2014 - 19:00 to Saturday, October 18, 2014 - 18:55

    Venue: 

    Logan Center for the Arts - Chicago, United States
  • Ute Aurand: Here and Now

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    A central figure in the Berlin experimental film scene since the 1980s, Ute Aurand is one the most vital filmmakers active in the diary and portrait tradition today. For Aurand, who works in 16mm just like her precursors Jonas Mekas, Margaret Tait and Marie Menken, “the diaristic form develops out of an inner dialogue with my surroundings, a silent visual conversation. The source of inspiration is daily life, the fountain which never stops and offers itself to everyone. It is a great joy and challenge to transform my inner dialogue into film.”

    Dates: 

    Monday, October 27, 2014 - 20:30
    Tuesday, October 28, 2014 - 20:30
  • Turbidus Film Presents Stan Brakhage & Phil Solomon

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    Brakhage and Solomon are two American giants in the so-called poetic, lyrical and personal film. Stan Brakhage is one of the most influential filmmakers in American avant-garde cinema, noted for his unflinching social commentaries and technical innovations. Over his nearly 40-year career, he has made over 200 films of varying length. He made his first film, Interim (1952) at age 18 after dropping out of college. Brakhage films seek to change the way we see. They encourage viewers to eschew traditional narrative structure in favor of pure visual perception that is not reliant on naming what is seen; rather his goal is to create a more visceral visual experience, for he believes that a "stream-of visual-consciousness could be nothing less than the pathway of the soul." To this end, his films are shot in highly sensual colors and utilize minimal soundtracks. Phil Solomon is an internationally recognized filmmaker and has been teaching both film history/aesthetics and film production at CU since 1991. Professor Solomon's work has been screened in every major venue for experimental film throughout the U.S. and Europe, including 3 Cineprobes (one-man shows) at the Museum of Modern Art and two Whitney Biennials. 

    Dates: 

    Friday, October 17, 2014 - 18:30

    Venue: 

    Fylkingen - Stockholm, Sweden

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