Screenings

  • Turbidus Film Presents: Cécile Fontaine

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    Film screenings and artist talk
    Curated By Daniel A. Swarthnas

    "Cécile Fontaine works with what can be called margins, the excluded parts of cinema, revindicating scratching, soaking, de-collage and so filmmaking passes as a primarily plastic activity, with almost no material resources, renewing at once with the first major steps of the Dadaists in their collage – principally in the works of Schwitters and especially the collage of Hannah Höch executed with a kitchen knife and the work of recycling or how to make art without having the air to have touched it." - Yann Beauvais

    Born in 1957 in south of France, grew up in a French oversea departement named Ile de la Réunion in the Indian Ocean; studied art both in France (1975/1979) and in the United States (Boston 1980/1986) where she started making film in 1982 after taking an evening film class at Massachussetts College of Art then registering full time at School of Museum of Fine Arts, majoring cinema. Returned in France in 1986 and lives since then in Paris, teaching art fulltime in a primary school and making films.

    Dates: 

    Sunday, April 13, 2014 - 19:00 to Monday, April 14, 2014 - 18:55

    Venue: 

    Fylkingen - Stockholm, Sweden
  • Directors Lounge Screening: Karl F. Stewart - Impressions in Mind

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    Karl F. Stewart: Impressions in Mind
    Photographs and Video

    Karl F. Stewart makes a mark in digital photography and video with his saturated colors and his rigorous compositions showing urban landscapes. He works with a photographic hybrid combination between still images and videos that do not hide their origin in their photographic concept. After being a documentary photographer in the 70's in Pittsburgh, his home town, he worked as an English lecturer in Italy for 24 years, before he took up photography again only 5 years ago, now going fully digital.

    San Francisco, his next temporary residency after Italy, became his starting point for his relaunch in photography, where he mostly explored the downtown area. Not just the financial district of San Francisco, but a big part of the highly dense urban areas show an amazing economic growth with glossy surfaces and artificial contemporary green landscaping on one hand, and wide spread poverty of homeless people on the other. “The Unearthly Beauty of Simulated Nature in Contemporary Architecture” is Stewart's most pronounced piece from that period, presented as a video-photo essay. At the same time, the artist started exploring motion-blur and photoshop cut-outs. “Impressions of Movement” is a series of panoramic works that resulted and which he continued in different countries such as USA, Italy and France. The time-based presentation of digital pictures, that seems to be natural to the medium, led to digital video as his preferred medium at the moment. The artist recently moved to Düsseldorf, where he continues exploring landscapes and urban settings in often unearthly colors. Like with “K-20”, showing a small fountain at the K 20 Museum in Düsseldorf, the examinations of urban-nature relations combined with sometimes witty surprising experiments, seem to propel his creative energy most successfully.

    Dates: 

    Thursday, March 27, 2014 - 21:00 to Friday, March 28, 2014 - 20:55

    Venue: 

    Z-Bar, Berlin - Berlin, Germany
  • CGAI: Larry Gottheim

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    Born in 1936, Larry Gottheim taught himself 16mm filmmaking in the 1960s and became one of America's leading avant-garde filmmakers. From his late-1960s series of sublime 'single-shot' films to the dense sound/image constructs of the mid-1970s and after, his cinema is the cinema of presence, of observation, and of deep conscious engagement. While addressing genres of landscape, diary and assemblage filmmaking, Gottheim's work properly stands alone in its intensive investigations of the paradoxes between direct, sensual experience in collision with complex structures of repetition, anticipation and memory.

    Gottheim developed the Department of Cinema in Binghamton, N.Y. and taught there for more than three decades. This extremely influential department attracted the most talented artists, academics, and filmmakers of the day including Ken Jacobs, Hollis Frampton, Peter Kubelka, and Ernie Gehr among many others. In the 1990's Gottheim has also served for a brief time as director of the Filmmaker's Co-op in New York. Gottheim?s films are in the collections of museums and archives throughout the world, and a program of his restored early films premiered at the 2005 New York Film Festival. 

    Dates: 

    Tuesday, March 18, 2014 (All day)
    Wednesday, March 19, 2014 (All day)
    Thursday, March 20, 2014 (All day)
    Friday, March 21, 2014 (All day)

    Venue: 

  • BORDERLAND - The entropy of identities

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    BORDERLAND – The entropy of identities international video art screening will be held in Almeria (Spain) at Museo de Almería on the 13th of March 2014 and at MECA Mediterráneo Centro Artístico on the 27th of March 2014; and in Granada (Spain) at the Faculty of Fine Arts of the University of Granada, on the 23rd of April 2014. Forty-six artists have been selected to take part in the exhibition.

    Entropy is conceptually defined as the measure of the level of disorder in a changing system. Starting from this fascinating concept, each person can be considered as a changing system, as the same as for a specific culture, city or country, until the whole universe. All these systems are subjected to a process of continuous inner evolution which overcome their own boundaries to contaminate and crossbreed each others. Borders of this evolving systems get more and more fleeting, and their identities turn out fluid, multiple and changeable. These continue changes find in the inevitability of evolution their measure of order.

    Dates: 

    Thursday, March 13, 2014 - 20:00 to Friday, March 14, 2014 - 19:55
    Thursday, March 27, 2014 - 20:00 to Friday, March 28, 2014 - 19:55
    Wednesday, April 23, 2014 - 20:00 to Thursday, April 24, 2014 - 19:55
  • Early Monthly Segments #61: 5th Anniversary Screening

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    To celebrate our fifth year anniversary we’ve given ourselves the challenge of programming (and projecting) an evening of double projections!

    Vanessa O’Neill’s sublime Suspension uses rephotography, tinting and superimposition to turn a westward view of the Pacific Ocean into a sublime interplay of waves, light and grain. Malcolm Le Grice’s classic Berlin Horse is a film that explores the possibilities of the loop, taking a short fragment of a silent film and subjecting it to a series of colour processes amplified by the phased music of Brian Eno. Daichi Saito’s Never a Foot Too Far, Even is a contemporary expansion, superimposing a section of a Kung-Fu action film into a perceptual play, accompanied by a violin composition by Malcolm Goldstein. Tonight’s screening of Visions in Mediation #2: Mesa Verde, Stan Brakhage’s vision quest to the ruins of the Ancient Peublo cliff dwellings in Southwestern Colorado is amplified by a second print given to Kate MacKay from the filmmaker as a gift. And finally, a third projector will be sparked to present For My Crushed Right Eye, Toshio Matsumoto’s ode to the social unrest and expansion of the late sixties, all of which threatened to burst out of the frame.

    Dates: 

    Monday, March 17, 2014 - 20:00 to Tuesday, March 18, 2014 - 19:55

    Venue: 

    Gladstone Hotel - Toronto, Canada
  • Magic Lantern Presents: Body/Voice

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    It is often noted that men and women inhabit space very differently, as evidenced by the popular Tumblr account, Men Taking Up Too Much Space on the Train. Photo after photo show male passengers with legs maximally splayed and arms raised to grasp a Very Important Newspaper, while women demurely cross their arms and legs with visible signs of discomfort. It doesn't take a professional philosopher or sociologist to realize that this stark contrast between spatial expansion and contraction is not a fact of biology but a set of learned behaviors. For most women, something has broken in the unifying chain of consciousness/body/world; an institutionalized double standard ensures that men enjoy the lion's share of free, unhindered, fluid movement in space.

    The films in this program demonstrate various ways in which women filmmakers have sought to engage more fully with their world, oscillating between the savage critique of social norms and the affirmation of new powers and pleasures. It goes without saying that cinema, with its disjuncture of image and sound, its capacity for metamorphosis and even the grotesque, is one of the most powerful tools we have for the reconfiguration of body and voice.

    Curated by Seth Watter

    Dates: 

    Thursday, March 13, 2014 - 20:00 to Friday, March 14, 2014 - 19:55

    Venue: 

    Cable Car Cinema & Cafe - Providence, United States
  • Judith Barry: …Cairo stories

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    Created from a collection of more than 200 interviews Judith Barry conducted with Cairene women between the US invasion of Iraq in 2003 and the beginning of the Egyptian Revolution in 2011, …Cairo stories is a series of short video monologues. The selection of stories chronicles personal experiences of women from a variety of social and economic classes in Egypt and expands the artist’s concerns with notions of representation, history, subjectivity, and translation – particularly as these ideas circulate across cultures.

    The original interviews were conducted in simultaneous translation to maintain fluidity and integrity of tone and meaning, and Barry considers them to be collaborations between her and the subjects. The vast source material was then ‘vetted’ by a diverse range of Cairene women. The emotional integrity of each woman’s story is the crux of this project; the translators and interviewees remained active participants in both the narrative arc of their stories and the development of the project. In the gallery, a selection of 15 narratives is performed by actors, highlighting that all stories, including those we tell ourselves, are ultimately fictions.

    Dates: 

    Thursday, April 10, 2014 (All day) to Saturday, May 31, 2014 (All day)

    Venue: 

    waterside contemporary - London, United Kingdom
  • Xcèntric: Robert E. Fulton. A country in the mind

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    US filmmaker, aviator and musician, Robert E. Fulton (1939-2002) died in a crash involving his own plane in Pennsylvania. He was an artist of unwonted complexity and depth. He worked as an aerial cameraman and director of photography on various documentaries, including those of his friend Robert Gardner. His enigmatic, labyrinthine films are full of a defiant poetics that gives rise to a metaphysical prose. Fulton was an acrobat and an agitator, mixing images and ideas to create unusual superpositions that convey a highly personal sense of lyricism. His cinema is that of the adventurer, revealing to us the dazzling landscape of a new world.

    Programme:
    - Vineyard IV, 3 min
    - Swimming Stone, 14 min
    - Starlight, 1970, 5 min
    - Path of Cessation, 1974, 15 min
    - Aleph, 1982, silent, 17 min
    - Wilderness: A Country in the Mind, 1984, 20 min.

    Dates: 

    Thursday, March 13, 2014 - 20:00 to Friday, March 14, 2014 - 19:55

    Venue: 

  • Kinoplaylist: Laida Lertxundi & Alberto Cabrera Bernal

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    As part of the Cinema Revealed series

    Laida Lertxundi and Alberto Cabrera Bernal are two filmmakers who choose celluloid format as a means of expression. Thus, traditional videoplaylist, where a certain character shares his favorite online videos with the audience, becomes in this case a hypnotic session called kinoplaylist, where thanks to two 16mm projectors, the Internet is replaced by real cinema. An innovative proposal with crossed projections where they will share their own movies, inspiring movies by other authors and a final surprise that is a project-specific collaboration between the two artists.

    Dates: 

    Sunday, March 2, 2014 - 18:30

    Venue: 

  • Choreographies of Creation and Destruction

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    Joshua Churchill, John Davis and Greg Pope In Person
    Presented in association with ShapeShifters Cinema and Stanford University’s Thomas Welton Stanford Art Gallery

    In Apparent Motion 2012—the performance cinema centerpiece to that year’s Crossroads film festival—British artist Greg Pope brought down the house with the 16mm Cipher Screen, his two-projector masterwork of erasure and construction. For a follow-up appearance Pope returns to the Bay Area for a series of expanded cinema performances with live sound collaboration at Stanford University, ShapeShifters Cinema and Cinematheque. Tonight’s program features Pope’s his dual-slide projector piece Celluloid, a slide projector-based flicker film, a “celluloid ghost,” a proto-cinematic excursion through the detritus of industrial cinema. Live soundtrack to Celluloid to be performed by local electroacoustic ensemble Voicehandler. Single-channel films by Pope—including Mass Observation, Moon Walk and Incidence Room—will also screen. Preceding Pope is the Bay Area’s own John Davis with his sound/image amalgams and live slo-motion image analysis, presented with the live sonic accompaniment of Joshua Churchill. (Steve Polta)

    Dates: 

    Saturday, March 1, 2014 - 19:30

    Venue: 

    Center for New Music - San Francisco, United States

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