Screenings

  • Barbara Hammer: Early Short Films

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    As part of the Free to Love: Cinema of the Sexual Revolution series
    Filmmaker Barbara Hammer will appear in person to introduce her work and hold a post-screening discussion.

    Programme:
    - A Gay Day (USA, 1973, 16mm, 3 min.)
    - Menses (USA, 1974, 16mm, 4 min.)
    - Dyketactics X 2 (USA, 1974, 16mm, 8 min.)
    - Women I Love (USA, 1976, 16mm, 27 min.)
    - Multiple Orgasm (USA, 1977, 16mm, 10 min.)
    - Double Strength (USA, 1978, 16mm, 15 min.)
    - No No Nooky TV (USA, 1987, 16mm, 10 min.)

    Free to Love: The Cinema of the Sexual Revolution has been supported by The Pew Center for Arts & Heritage

    Dates: 

    Thursday, February 13, 2014 - 19:00

    Venue: 

    International House Philadelphia - Philadelphia, Estados Unidos
  • Connectivity through cinema: Stephanie Gray

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    Join Mono no aware for an intimate screening presentation of recent works by Stephanie Gray presented with live poetry readings. Among the works being shown are several city-symphonies about her former hometown, Buffalo, NY; a film of a certain vanishing Coney Island; pockets of mysterious places in lower Manhattan; and atmospheric and wind-driven portraits of streetscapes in Queens and Chinatown. Her work is motivated by a sort of philosophical conversation with the city, “even if I don’t always know what it means or what it is, the filming makes sense of it in a kind of magic way. The city speaks and makes meaning, of both the past, present and future and where do memories fit in?” Her relationship with New York is intimate, and her ability to capture the subtle whispers amidst the chaos allows one to see the invisible.

    Dates: 

    Monday, February 17, 2014 - 19:30

    Venue: 

    Center for Performance Research - New York, Estados Unidos
  • Xcèntric: A camera of one’s own. Film portraits and diaries by Ute Aurand, Margaret Tait and Marie Menken

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    A central figure on Berlin’s film scene, Ute Aurand makes her films in the tradition of the diary and the filmed portrait, strongly influenced by Margaret Tait, Marie Menken and Jonas Mekas. Films that explore the private lives of her friends, the beauty and sensibility of light and the textures of spaces, meticulously edited and structured “that evoke the specific rhythms and the personality of people and places captured by the camera”. This programme centres primarily on the recent filmed portraits of Aurand, whose work has just started to become known internationally in the last few years. It is brought together with that of Tait and Menken, with the presentation of a little-known film made on a trip to Spain with Kenneth Anger and left unfinished. Ute Aurand will be present at the screening.

    Dates: 

    Thursday, February 6, 2014 - 20:00

    Venue: 

  • Difraktion 2014

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    After three successful editions LaborBerlin once again presents DIFFRAKTION, its very own annual showcase of new works on film by its members and friends. This year, DIFFRAKTION will encompass a full­day event with various film programs, talks, film performances and live music. 

    LaborBerlin is a nonprofit, independent film collective, open to any and every individual interested in artist­run initiatives and analogue film practices. With this in mind, the goal of this event is to be an open invitation to anyone that’s interested in preserving the artistic use of analog film, and in supporting collective initiatives that seek to make these types of practices open, accessible, non­hierarchical and non­commercial.

    We believe that the present moment, when most traditional film labs are closing and digital media has become the dominant option for audiovisual production, is not a time of crisis for analog film but a moment of opportunity. Film and the knowledge around it, now free from the demands of the commercial sector, can begin a new life as a truly independent medium to be openly shared and collectively developed. However, with this opportunity come many morechallenges. Which is why we want to present this event as an open forum for discussions and suggestions on how to overcome the challenges that LaborBerlin, and many other organizations like it, face today. LaborBerlin in particular is currently at risk because of upcoming rent hikes. Therefore this event also serves as a fundraiser to guarantee that we can keep an open and economically accessible space.

    Dates: 

    Saturday, February 1, 2014 (All day)

    Venue: 

    Villa Neukölln - Berlin, Germany
  • HASENHERZ: Miloš Tomic

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    Miloš Tomic is a multimedia artist whose projects span film, photography, collages, and sculpture. Tomic studied directing and then  animation—experiences that continue to influence his practice. His subjects are either comprised of or preoccupied with disposable or disposed objects. In fact, his doctoral thesis was titled “Preciousness of discarded objects, i.e. trash as the material for film, photography…” His object-based works are modified quotidian objects, like shoes sewn shut or brushes with thorns instead of bristles. Tomic also has a category of sculpture called “Pearls” which, as he describes, are “to be understood as things that are precious, wrongly forgotten or lost somewhere, but now found.” Together with Vladimir Peric Miloš Tomic represented Serbia at the Venice Biennial 2013.

    Dates: 

    Saturday, January 25, 2014 - 11:00

    Venue: 

  • Phantoscope: Stephen Dwoskin's Dyn Amo

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    Phantoscope is Triskel Christchurch’s new quarterly experimental cinema event. In combining programmes of shorts and features from past and present, it promises to leave both eyes and minds wide open with its striking selection of some of the most startling and unusual films cinema has to offer. It launches with the late Stephen Dwoskin’s masterpiece Dyn Amo, a searing and controversial exploration of the distinction between a person’s self and the projection of that self to others, set in a strip club. The hallucinatory intensity of Dwoskin’s unique camerawork is memorably underscored by Gavin Bryars relentless drone soundtrack. 

    - Dyn Amo (Stephen Dwoskin, 1973, UK, 120 min)
    Starring: Jenny Runacre, Pat Ford and Catherine Kessler

    Phantoscope is programmed by Cork-based filmmaker Maximilian Le Cain, who brings to the task four years of experience as film curator of Black Sun, the noted experimental music/film event that was a mainstay of the Cork scene between 2009 and 2013. 

    Dates: 

    Thursday, January 23, 2014 - 18:30

    Venue: 

  • Xcèntric: Andrew Noren, Charmed Particles

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    Andrew Noren’s The Adventures of the Exquisite Corpse film series has an autobiographical dimension and is both a testimony to his private life and a tribute to love. Part four, Charmed Particles, is one of the best examples of the abstract, transforming qualities of black and white film. It explores textures and forms, combining high-contrast photography, detail shots and pixilation to create visual music of a delicate yet powerful kinesis that reveals the simple beauty of the domestic and the phantasmal nature of appearances. A luminous world in which light becomes real and illusion, flesh.

    - Charmed Particles (Andrew Noren, 1978, 16mm., silent, 78 min.)

    Dates: 

    Thursday, January 23, 2014 - 20:00

    Venue: 

  • Xcèntric: Time capsules. The collage films of Arthur Lipsett

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    The figure of Arthur Lipsett occupies one of the most original and exciting fringes of editing and film collage. His work, which fascinated filmmakers as varied as Kubrick, Brakhage and George Lucas, was interrupted by Lipsett’s mental problems (he suffered from bipolar disorder) and the torment that led to his suicide, at the age of 46. He started out making sound collages, which he then transferred to his brilliant, enigmatic pieces produced by Canada’s NFB: combinations of images and sounds, in films of recycling and deconstruction, ironic and sarcastic visual essays about consumerism or critiques of the mass media, with jazzy or syncopated rhythms that illuminated a sense of cinema and a unique way of thinking.

    Programme:
    - Very Nice, Very Nice (Arthur Lipsett,1961, video, 6 min)
    - 21-87 (Arthur Lipsett,1964, 16 mm, 9 min)
    - Perceptual Learning (Arthur Lipsett,1965, video, 11 min)
    - Free Fall (Arthur Lipsett,1964, video, 9 min)
    - A Trip Down Memory Lane (Arthur Lipsett, 1965, video, 12 min)
    - Fluxes (Arthur Lipsett,1968, 16 mm, 23 min)
    - Lipsett Diaries (Theodore Ushev, 2010, 35 mm, 14 min.)

    Dates: 

    Thursday, January 16, 2014 - 20:00

    Venue: 

  • New Korean Experimental Cinema: Space Cell Film Lab

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    For his regular screenings, the Collectif Jeune Cinéma organises a one hour programme devoted to recent Korean experimental films (2013). The films have been made inside the Space Cell laboratory. The screening is programmed and introduced by Pip Chodorov (filmmaker, director of Re:Voir editions).  

    The lab was founded in 2004. It’s a small hand-made film lab, but first attempt in Korea. We have darkroom for hand processing, optical printer, steenbeck, bolexes and almost all kind of 16 or super 8mm equipment. (Jangwook Lee, director) 

    Programme
    - Still Moving, Or (Sung-Kwon Jeon, 16mm, colour, sound, South Korea, 2013, 23')
    - Hold Me (Sook Hyun Kim & Hye-Ieong Cho, 16mm, colour, sound, South Korea, 2013, 9')
    - Conversation, Print 1 (Jangwook Lee, 16mm, B&W, silent, South Korea, 2013, 3')
    - Na-Dul-Lee (Inhan Cho & Yoon Joo Lee, DV, colour, sound, South Korea, 2013, 18')
    - Song for Zero person (Mihye Cha, Video HD, colour, silent, South Korea, 2013, 8'45)

    Dates: 

    Thursday, January 23, 2014 - 20:30

    Venue: 

    Cinéma La Clef - Paris, France
  • Under the Sun: The Films of Rose Lowder

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    Brimming with vibrant images of blossoms, orchards, insects and meadows, the works of celebrated filmmaker Rose Lowder explore our relation with and impact on the world. Rare gems selected by Lowder will be shown alongside key works from one of the most distinct bodies of work in French experimental cinema. Grounded in her interest in radical agriculture, colour theory and the landscapes of her adoptive home in the south of France, Lowder is committed to filmmaking as an ecological practice inseparable from her lifelong collecting and championing of non-commercial cinema. Trained as a painter and sculptor in Lima, Peru, and London, Lowder turned to filmmaker in 1977 after studying with Jean Rouch.

    Her engagement with ways of living and filming will be explored alongside the meticulous design, composition and production of her films. The screenings will be introduced and followed by conversations with the artist.

    Dates: 

    Friday, January 17, 2014 - 19:00 to Saturday, January 18, 2014 - 20:00

    Venue: 

    Tate Modern - London , United Kingdom

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