Screenings

  • Ernie Gehr: Framing urban ghosts

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    Ernie Gehr (1941) is a key figure in American avant-garde cinema and the structural film movement, and he is undoubtedly one of the most influential and innovative artists of his generation. The film Serene Velocity, which he made in 1970 in the cellar corridors of Binghamton university, is a masterly synthesis of the conceptual and aesthetical preoccupations which even in his earliest films (Reverberation, 1969) tend to subvert a purely illusionist cinema by affirming the primacy of its elementary constituents. For over fifty years since then, Gehr has been deploying a genealogy of the photographic in cinema, no matter whether it is made on celluloid or digitally, and no matter whether it is screened in a theatre or as (part of) an installation. Gehr’s body of work therefore constitutes a homogeneous and consistent entity in which the artist, nourished by his observations of quotidian American urban landscapes (Winter Morning, 2013), his reflection on the obsessive nature of the photographic or cinematographic image, and the temporary nature of human life (A Commuter’s Life (What a Life!), 2014), purposefully articulates recurrent themes.

    Ernie Gehr will personally attend the presentation of this selection from his films which also includes some unreleased titles. The screening will be followed by a conversation between Ernie Gehr and Jonathan Pouthier of the Paris Centre Pompidou.

    Dates: 

    Tuesday, February 17, 2015 - 20:00

    Venue: 

  • Xcèntric: Listening to space. Three films by Robert Beavers

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    Robert Beavers personally controls every screening of his films, which are always an exception: in this session we present his latest film in a dialogue with Still Light and Sotiros, both of which are extraordinary to see. Beavers was 16 when he met Gregory Markopoulos, who was then, at 37, a prestigious filmmaker, who encouraged Beavers to leave school and start making films. Shortly after, they went together toEurope, where Beavers put together his research into the “philosophical majesty of the image”: “the spectator's power of perception, liberated by this order of the senses and not by dramatic empathy, begins to learn what composes film and its harmonies...” Beavers’s work is a prodigious meditation of extreme meticulousness, subtlety and emotion, on the processes and materials of film (cutting, light, emulsion, sound): the artisan and manual gestures (of gardening or music) harmonize with the gestures of editing, and extend and poetize the visibility of the smallest things.

    Dates: 

    Thursday, February 5, 2015 - 20:00

    Venue: 

  • Experimental documentaries: Chris Bravo, Ann Deborah Levy, Chris Lynn and Leandro Listorti

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    Curated by Tova Beck-Friedman in her on-going series that explores short experimental documentary works, this program features short films and videos about “place” — rural, urban, historic and/or contemporary — in a variety of locations in the US, the Czech Republic, China, and Uruguay.  All of the filmmakers explore their subjects in distinct visual ways and approach their soundtracks imaginatively utilizing location sounds, studio recordings, manufactured sounds, and/or silence

    Dates: 

    Tuesday, January 27, 2015 - 18:00

    Venue: 

    Anthology Film Archives - New York, United States
  • Stephanie Barber: a folding of risk and taker— DAREDEVILS

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    Stephanie Barber in person

    Deeply philosophical, frequently humorous and deceptively simple in form, the films, video works, poetry and book projects of Stephanie Barber operate at the intersections of spoken, written, composed, conversational and incidental language, reflecting shifting experiential qualities and varying modes of address. Barber’s feature-length DAREDEVILS (2013) is a three-part narrative portrait of risk and intimacy, presenting an interview between a young writer and an admired artist as a reverberating life event and turning point. Writes Barber, "The classic rising action, climax and denouement are sculpted, not by cause and effect, but by the subtle movements to and from understanding that are inherent in conversation. Bubbles of intimacy are blown and popped, begin to be blown again." 

    Dates: 

    Saturday, February 14, 2015 - 19:30

    Venue: 

    Yerba Buena Center for the Arts - San Francisco, United States
  • Cinema Anèmic #01: David Domingo

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    Presents ... "A terrible day that ended fatally"

    Projecting a splendid selection of films made by this film maker specialized in shooting on analog film in super 8 and 16mm. Psychedelic representations of everyday scenes, animations figurative elements reminiscent Pop and evocative portraits of queer influence are some of the constants of a particular brilliantly attractive world.

    Dates: 

    Friday, January 23, 2015 - 20:30

    Venue: 

    Espai ST3 - Barcelona, Spain
  • Robert Nelson: On a thread

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    Following the tradition of the west coast American independent filmmakers, Robert Nelson (1930-2012) has created a unique cinema profoundly marked by a corrosive humour and a subtle sense of self-mockery. Directed with his friend, the painter William Wiley, The Great Blondino (1967) pays an astonishing homage to the French tightrope walker Charles Blondin (XIX century) famous for having crossed the Niagara Falls on a wire. At the crossroads of European surrealism and popular American culture, the film of Robert Nelson is an invitation to a reverie with a tint of tragic absurdity. This portrayal of an uncertain universe - on the edge of consciousness and unconsciousness – is sharing with the enigmatic collage film by the American filmmaker Larry Jordan, Hamfat Asar (1965) a powerful poetry loaded with desires and death impulses.

    Screening introduced by Jonathan Pouthier (Centre Pompidou)

    Dates: 

    Wednesday, January 28, 2015 - 19:00

    Venue: 

    Centre Pompidou - Paris, France
  • Gunvor Nelson: Hidden Worlds

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    Born in Sweden, Gunvor Nelson (1931-) began her artistic career as a filmmaker in the mid-60s in San Francisco (USA). Major figure of the American West coast experimental film community, she has created an extraordinary filmic oeuvre, in which we can admire both the strangeness of her characters (Fog Pumas, 1967) and the poetic nature of her imaginary worlds (My Name is Oona, 1969) and the strength of her feminist commitments (Schmeerguntz, 1966). Since the 90s, Gunvor Nelson has lived and worked in Sweden where she continues through films, videos, paintings or installations, her exploration of the Swedish landscape and identity (Light Years, 1987).

    Screening introduced by Julie Savelli (from Paul Valery University - Montpellier III)

    Dates: 

    Wednesday, January 21, 2015 - 19:00

    Venue: 

    Centre Pompidou - Paris, France
  • Light Movement 1: Margaret Rorison, Lucy Parker, Lara Schröder

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    The opening screening of Light Movement will feature three contemporary filmmakers, Margaret Rorison, Lucy Parker and Lara Schröder, and will be kindly hosted at Another Vacant Space, Berlin Wedding.

    Margaret Rorison

    Margaret Rorison is a curator and filmmaker from Baltimore, Maryland. She works with language, sound and imagery to create installations, films and live 16mm projections. Her work is an impressionistic exploration into the visceral nature of memory and experience.

    Dates: 

    Thursday, January 15, 2015 - 20:30

    Venue: 

    Another Vacant Space - Berlin, Germany
  • Xcèntric: Filmed therapies - Anne Charlotte Robertson

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    The films of Anne Charlotte Robertson (1949-2012), mostly filmed in super-8, document the effects of her bipolar disorder, nervous breakdowns and internment in psychiatric centres. As she films her feelings and experiences with an intimate, direct, raw approach that is not without humour, the different layers of sound—particularly the filmmaker’s voice—generate an emotive, introspective and essayistic reflection on her life, narrated in Five Years Diary (1981-1997). After seeing her films, Jonas Mekas wrote her a letter: “I was so overwhelmed with what I saw. I don’t think it’s me who is a film diarist: it’s you! It’s you! I was very very moved and I couldn’t sleep thinking about it.” The session is complemented by a film by Carole Schneemann, one of her great influences, and the final ode that Saul Levine, her tutor at the Massachusetts College of Arts, made after her funeral.

    Dates: 

    Sunday, January 11, 2015 - 18:30

    Venue: 

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